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This is why my little college-math-ed blog has so many readers:

Because I am Everycollegeinstructor. In U.S. report released this month, 40 per cent of professors who were surveyed said that most of the students they teach lack the basic skills for university-level work. Further, the survey conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles found that 56 per cent cited working with unprepared…

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Archives, Home And Native Land, Talking To Strangers

Off the beaten path

I never got around to writing about my tour of the Gulf Islands last June. * * *The public transit system that serves the Gulf Islands is unreliable when you’re in a hurry, but it’s friendly and it’s free. During my forays onto Salt Spring and Pender, I quickly marked myself as an outsider by looking askance as would-be commuters…

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What passes for success

I realize that I don’t post many stories about my positive experiences with students. Part of it is because those experiences don’t require the sort of catharsis that the horror storiesdemand. Part of it is that my darkly comical style of writing doesn’t lend itself to expositions of, like, students actually learning stuff from me. And part of it is because sometimes, the…

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Archives, Know Thyself

It surprises no one that the last letter in my Myers-Briggs type is a ‘J’

John at Toilet Paper With Page Numbers, one of the most underappreciated blogs around, has an excellent post about the importance of just making a bloody decision already, rather than continuing to do research ad infinitum until one is confident that enough information has been gathered. Like, in general. John quotes from a variety of folks who are better-read than I, and who are…

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All right, ‘fess up.

Inspired most recently by Vito Prosciutto’s latest post, I want to know: who, at some point, thought I was male? Who thought I was male right up until they read the previous sentence? Who, at this point, still thinks I am male? Come on, give it to me – I can take it. The irony, as I told Vito, is…

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Archives

Conics, then and now

Back in 1995, high school students learned about conics. A typical test question about them looked something like this: Give the equation, in standard form, of the conic whose graph is pictured below: While this question still resides squarely outside the domain of rocket science, it tests a number of skills that are required to solve it correctly and efficiently.…

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Back in the day

My maternal grandfather’s family fled Poland in 1934 on the last boat to Canada before the war. He, his brother, and his parents spent a week on the ship, and then another two weeks quarantined for chicken pox, before they headed off to Montreal with ten dollars in their pockets. Around this time, according to family legend, my paternal grandmother’s brothers were…

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You won’t find yourself in university if you got lost somewhere else

This article from the Georgia Straight does a decent job of quantifying and probing some observations I made in some earlier posts I wrote about the contradictory messages students receive on the relationship between university and employment. University, it seems, is neither a path to a career nor a place to develop intellectually – rather, it’s a place to wander about aimlessly with little guidance…

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Archives

Is there a bike expert in the house?

Last time I asked, I received. Let’s see if this works twice… The background: when I arrived back on the mainland last month, I decided that I was going to bike one thousand kilometers before the beginning of September. Biking here is a lot more pleasant than biking in Island Town: while the terrain is far from flat, it’s bikable, and there…

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