Tall, Dark, and Mysterious

1/31/2006

Technology: the cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems

File under: Sound And Fury, Those Who Can't, Queen of Sciences. Posted by Moebius Stripper at 8:58 pm.

Reading this article about a series of math workshops directed at students and parents, I am reminded of a famous fifty-year-old psychology experiment:

In Festinger and Carlsmith’s classic 1959 experiment, students were made to perform tedious and meaningless tasks, consisting of turning pegs quarter-turns, then removing them from a board, then putting them back in, and so forth. Subjects rated these tasks very negatively. After a long period of doing this, students were told the experiment was over and they could leave.

However, the experimenter then asked the subject…to try to persuade another subject (who was actually a confederate) that the dull, boring tasks the subject had just completed were actually interesting and engaging. Some subjects were paid $20 [for this], another group was paid $1…

When [later] asked to rate the peg-turning tasks, those in the $1 group showed a much greater propensity to embellish in favor of the experiment when asked to lie about the tasks. Experimenters theorized that when paid only $1, students were forced to internalize the attitude they were induced to express, because they had no other justification. Those in the $20 condition, it is argued, had an obvious external justification for their behavior, which the experimenters claim explains their lesser willingness to lie favoring the tasks in the experiment.

In what I can only infer to be the 2006 version of this experiment, two math experts who believe that students rely too much on calculators, are then sent into schools to…teach students to use calculators.

Sunshine and Speier will show students how to do math problems without having to reach for the calculator.

Sunshine and Speier both said students rely too much on using the calculator to solve math problems.

“Get the pencils and papers into their hands as soon as possible…,” Sunshine said.

Sounds about right. I can’t wait to see where this is going!

Speier will also work with Lego Robotics and show high school students how to use graphing calculators.

Huh? But didn’t you just say…? Oh, never mind:

Speier and Sunshine will help students understand basic math because they said they have seen students struggle with basic math concepts like multiplication.

So have I, and so, I presume, has everyone who has ever taught math on this continent. And I agree with Speier and Sunshine when they talk about how the best way to understand basic math is to put pencils and papers, rather than fucking graphing calculators, into students’ hands as soon as possible.

What, then, accounts for the schedule of these workshops?

Monday, Jan. 30: Providing a good start in math at home: graphing and multiplication.

Tuesday, Jan. 31: What is Algebra all about? A two-hour crash course in the subject.

Wednesday, Feb. 1: Programming and Robotics with the Lego Robotics systems.

Thursday, Feb. 2: Programming the TI-83+ Calculators.

Given Speier and Sunshine’s lack of enthusiasm for the calculator-based curriculum, my guess is that Texas Instruments put them into the $20 group.